STONE HOUSES

Our Active Stone House Listings

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Bridge Gate Stone Colonial.............$999,000
Buckingham Twp, Bucks County PA

This formal stone house was originally constructed in 1720, with a 19th century stone addition.

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Hunter Stone Farmhouse.........$379,000
Springfield Twp, Bucks County PA

Wonderfully preserved stone house with a pond, wrap-around porch, walk-in fireplace.

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Upper Bucks Horse Property.........$638,000
E Rockhill Twp, Bucks County PA

Stone Farmhouse c.1816 w/barn, riding ring and paddocks adjacent to Bucks Co. Park Trail System.

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Our SOLD Stone Houses

Stone Houses we have sold

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Armitage House Farmhouse
Solebury Twp, Bucks County, PA

Antiquity, history, authenticity plus modern comfort.

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Orr's Ford on the Tohickon
Plumstead Twp, Bucks Co, PA

Pass between the stone pillars from Old Easton Rd and slip into the 18th C.

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Stone Manor House in Stockton
Delaware Twp, Hunterdon, NJ

This Sergeantsville landmark retains many original Colonial era features.

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Pursley's Ferry House
Holland Twp, Hunterdon, NJ

This circa 1750, homestead with river frontage was the Pursley's Ferry House.

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Cornelius Ely House
New Hope, Bucks County, PA

Just down the street from Coryell's Ferry, the best of in-town living.

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Liberty Farm Stone House
Upper Black Eddy, Bucks County

Stone farmhouse with stone addition using native fieldstones.

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Stone Farmhouse in Doylestown
Plumstead Twp, Bucks County

Stucco-over-stone farmhouse in the historic Dyerstown hamlet.

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Historic Fallsington
Falls Twp, Bucks County, PA

c.1690 Manor House witnessed Wm Penn's settlement in Lower Bucks.

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Stone House by the Covered Bridge
Doylestown Twp, Bucks County

Renovated Stucco-over-stone farmhouse with Pond and springhouse.

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Stone Farmhouse by the Lake
Haycock Twp, Bucks County, PA

c.1860 Farmhouse near Lake Tohickon with Stone Barn and pond

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Yerger Farm on 80 acres
Tinicum Twp, Bucks County

Gentleman’s farm borders on Ralph Stover Park with long-distance views.

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Vintage Stone Bed & Breakfast
Delaware Twp, Hunterdon, NJ

Silver Maple Farm c.1790 established rural B&B with 5 BR, 4.5 baths

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Point Pleasant Stone House
Plumstead Twp, Bucks County

c.1870 Stone house on the hill with its own stream and waterfall.

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A Farm in the Country
Pohatcong Twp, Warren Co. NJ

Renovated Plaster-over-stone House in historic Finesville on 18 acres.

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Burnt House Hill c.1740
Buckingham Twp, Bucks County

L-shaped restored farmhouse with walk-in fireplace, original millwork.

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Pittstown Stone House on 14 acres
Franklyn Twp, Hunterdon NJ

Re-create your own farm on a beautiful property w/long-distance views

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Stone House by the stream
Williams Twp, Northampton PA

Tucked behind a European-style wall with gourmet kitchen and stone patio.

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Riverview Stone on the Delaware
Williams Twp, Northampton PA

Minutes from the Riegelsville Bridge on 2 acres with an in-ground pool.

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Sergeantsville early vernacular
Delaware Twp, Hunterdon NJ

Very early house in town with two front doors and walk-in fireplace

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Henry Hartzell House
Richland Twp, Bucks County PA

Early 18th cent. stone house with original architectural details.

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Knecht Covered Bridge
Springfield Twp, Bucks County, PA

c.1750 stone and log farmhouse preserves original interior surfaces

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Bordering Cook's Creek
Springfield Twp, Bucks Co, PA

c.1813 stone farmhouse nestled on 8 acres with bank barn and guest house

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Willow Ponds
Springfield Twp, Bucks Co, PA

Vintage and Contemporary blend into a gorgeous vista overlooking 2 ponds

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Kingwood Locktown Homestead
Kingwood Twp, Hunterdon NJ

154 acre farm with 1741 Manor House and Guest House on 2 parcels.

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Buying a Stone House in the Delaware Valley

It wouldn't be too much of an exaggeration to say that people think of stone houses when they think of Bucks County - although there are numerous examples in Hunterdon County NJ as well. Since major roads from Philadelphia to New York passed through this region, there was a considerable population that settled here. They used building materials most readily at hand, the commonest and probably the most attractive being the soft grey limestone. Sometimes this stone is a solid grey, occasionally is almost blue, but often there are traces of yellow - ranging from the palest fawn to coppery orange. Often several of these colors appear in the stone of one house; almost always it is a stone glowing with color.

The earliest settlers tended to build their first houses out of native timber. These old log structures went up quickly, with squared timbers and notched corners, and the chinks - or gaps between the logs - were filled with sticks, horsehair, mud and straw. After a while, concentration could be on more permanent structures.

Most stone houses can be dated to the 18th century. The older stone houses, simple of line, solid and sturdy, fit into the landscape so well that they seem as much a part of the countryside as the fields and trees. They look as though they have grown out of the very soil - and they have, for the stone from which they were built was usually taken directly from the surrounding fields: hence fieldstone. Stone houses were rarely built after 1850 in this region, when so easier methods of construction came into common use.

The 21st century buyer is enamored by the look of exposed fieldstone, but the traditional stone house was often covered with a coat of stucco, or plaster to conform with the fashion of the day. The purpose of plastering was threefold: first, it provided a waterproof protection against the elements, and secondly, it helped with insulation; thirdly, it dressed the house. Houses built with cut stone were often left unplastered, but this was for the very rich. If you are looking at a plaster house, it is probably stone underneath. The best way to tell is to check out the window openings on the inside. Your stone house will have very deep windowsills: 18 inches or more.

Many of the stone houses in the area were originally small, two story farmhouses with two rooms on the main floor and two rooms on the upper floor, with a pie-shaped or winding staircase in the corner. Additions were completed over the generations, which would explain an extra-thick interior wall (originally an exterior wall). Many of these houses have two front doors. One of the front doors led to the parlor, which was kept pristine and rarely used except for special occasions. The other door would lead to the keeping room, where the family cooked, ate, and generally lived.

Southeastern Pennsylvania is the only part of the United States that commonly built houses of stone. These homes are a great part of our heritage in the Delaware River Valley, and people who live in them tend to view themselves as caretakers of historic treasures.

Adam Shapiro GRI, Associate Broker, Weidel Realtors, New Hope PA, Licensed in PA & NJ

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